SABINE PASS.

Dedicated to the Davis Guards—(The Living and the Dead).

By Mrs. M. J. Young.

Sabine Pass! in letters of gold,
Seem written upon the sky to-day,
Sabine Pass! with rhythmic feet,
Comes passionately stepping down my lay.

Sabine Pass! and the white sail ships,
With their cruel cannons’ grinning teeth,
Tearing in shreds the sullen smoke,
That seem’d weaving for us a winding sheet.

Sabine Pass! with its Irish hearts,
As true as the blessings the Shamrock brings,
Hearts as full of royal blood
As that which nerves the arms of kings.

Few, ah! few were the Davis band,
“We cannot conquer, but we can die!”
Said the dauntless Dowling, as up he sprang,
And nailed the starry cross on high.

Twenty-seven ships in pomp and pride,
Came sailing through the Pass that day;
Go ask of any Texan child,
How many ships survived the fray.

The God of battle, who loves the brave,
Who gave to Gideon of old the fight,
Sent victory down that “Guard” to save,
And crowned them with immortal light.

Dark storms have since o’erswept our land,
And tyrants do our souls harass,
But glory shines on Dowling’s band,
The forty-two heroes of the Pass.

Come, fill your glass with Texas wine,
Wine that is generous, red and free,
And drink with me to the knightliest man,
Who conquered the foe on land and sea.

But tears, rough, manly tears, for the dead,
Like dews of night bedim the glass,
With throbbing hearts and lifted hands,
We name him—“Dowling! of the Pass.”

Houston, Texas.