Moly, by Madison Cawein

  When by the wall the tiger-flower swings
    A head of sultry slumber and aroma;
  And by the path, whereon the blown rose flings
    Its obsolete beauty, the long lilies foam a
  White place of perfume, like a beautiful breast—
  Between the pansy fire of the west,
  And poppy mist of moonrise in the east,
    This heartache will have ceased.

  The witchcraft of soft music and sweet sleep—
    Let it beguile the burthen from my spirit,
  And white dreams reap me as strong reapers reap
    The ripened grain and full blown blossom near it;
  Let me behold how gladness gives the whole
  The transformed countenance of my own soul—
  Between the sunset and the risen moon
    Let sorrow vanish soon.

  And these things then shall keep me company:
    The elfins of the dew; the spirit of laughter
  Who haunts the wind; the god of melody
    Who sings within the stream, that reaches after

  The flow'rs that rock themselves to his caress:
  These of themselves shall shape my happiness,
  Whose visible presence I shall lean upon,
    Feeling that care is gone.

  Forgetting how the cankered flower must die;
    The worm-pierced fruit fall, sicklied to its syrup;
  How joy, begotten 'twixt a sigh and sigh,
  Waits with one foot forever in the stirrup,—
  Remembering how within the hollow lute
  Soft music sleeps when music's voice is mute;
  And in the heart, when all seems black despair,
    Hope sits, awaiting there.