A Voice on the Wind, by Madison Cawein

I

  She walks with the wind on the windy height
  When the rocks are loud and the waves are white,
  And all night long she calls through the night,
    "O my children, come home!"
  Her bleak gown, torn as a tattered cloud,
  Tosses around her like a shroud,
  While over the deep her voice rings loud,—
    "O my children, come home, come home!
     O my children, come home!"

II

  Who is she who wanders alone,
  When the wind drives sheer and the rain is blown?
  Who walks all night and makes her moan,
    "O my children, come home!"
  Whose face is raised to the blinding gale;
  Whose hair blows black and whose eyes are pale,
  While over the world goes by her wail,—
    "O my children, come home, come home!
     O my children, come home!"

III

  She walks with the wind in the windy wood;
  The dark rain drips from her hair and hood,
  And her cry sobs by, like a ghost pursued,
    "O my children, come home!"
  Where the trees loom gaunt and the rocks stretch drear,
  The owl and the fox crouch back with fear,
  As wild through the wood her voice they hear,—
    "O my children, come home, come home!
     O my children, come home!"

IV

  Who is she who shudders by
  When the boughs blow bare and the dead leaves fly?
  Who walks all night with her wailing cry,
    "O my children, come home!"
  Who, strange of look, and wild of tongue,
  With wan feet wounded and hands wild-wrung,
  Sweeps on and on with her cry, far-flung,—
    "O my children, come home, come home!
     O my children, come home!"

V

  'Tis the Spirit of Autumn, no man sees,
  The mother of Death and of Mysteries,
  Who cries on the wind all night to these,
    "O my children, come home!"
  The Spirit of Autumn, pierced with pain,
  Calling her children home again,
  Death and Dreams, through ruin and rain,—
    "O my children, come home, come home!
     O my children, come home!"